INSIGHTS

Multi-Talented Volunteers: Out and about this summer in the northwest suburbs

September 16, 2016 | Company

The MBX Cares program has aided local nonprofits by providing small volunteer groups to pitch in where extra hands and services are needed. Over the summer some of these organizations have included Partners for Progress, Habitat for Humanity, and Lambs Farm.

The opportunity to serve in our community leaves a positive impact on our employees, and not just because it’s a paid day out of the office for them! Their heart-warming stories remind us how fortunate we are at MBX and the value we can bring to others by sharing our time and talents.

Partners for Progress

One organization served twice by MBXers this quarter is Partners for Progress. This is a therapeutic riding center that offers disabled individuals the opportunity to ride on trained horses and strive to reach their maximum potential by becoming physically stronger, communicating needs and emotions better, and improving self-confidence and self-esteem.

One of the MBX volunteers, Zach Mitchell, documentation technician, shared his story from his day of service at Partners for Progress and how the experience moved him.

“Entering the front door, we saw a huge arena and a group of people walking a little girl wearing boots and a purple helmet on a large horse. I got the impression she was excited to get dressed up and come ride. The woman who led us to our work area explained the purpose of Partners for Progress and how it helps disabled people. I had absolutely no idea that horses were being used in this capacity as a therapeutic alternative to medicine. Then to see it in practice and actually see the reverence and connection between the horse and child was moving and humbling. The experience made me realize we weren’t there just to organize storage, load trailers and paint horse jump standards. We were there to help create a better atmosphere for people and horses so that the riders could build a connection and help reach their potential.”

Habitat for Humanity

Another organization we’ve stepped up twice for this quarter is Habitat for Humanity. They’ve put a number of MBX employees to work on improving homes for people who don’t have the resources to manage the repairs themselves. Ed Jamison, MBX Account Management Team Lead, spent the day with Habitat for Humanity and spoke about the experience.

“We were told the homeowners were being pressured by their city to fix the appearance of their house: replace windows and doors, refurbish the deck, put on a fresh coat of paint — basically improve most of their home’s exterior. It really needed some TLC to make it presentable, as I’m sure the neighbors would agree. It’s very fulfilling to help people when they’re facing a challenging situation and turn it into a positive change. It’s great when we can make a difference; it’s also great to work on something with coworkers from different departments that we don’t get a chance to interact with regularly.”

Lambs Farm

Lambs Farm is another popular opportunity for MBX volunteers, especially in the summer months! Many of the projects they need a hand with are outdoors, such as building improvements and beautification projects. Lambs Farm provides vocational and residential services for over 250 adults with developmental disabilities, and Kay Lattanzi, executive assistant at MBX, is grateful for the opportunity to help.

“While working on weeding and trimming around one of the residence buildings, I had the opportunity to converse with the Lambs Farm staff and residents. They were all enthusiastic, uplifting and appreciative of our participation.”

At MBX, there is no single season of giving; communities in need require help year round. So with the summer months behind us, we will turn our attention towards the physiological needs of the less fortunate and provide some of life’s most basic requirements that we often take for granted, namely food, clothing and shelter.

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